dynamic range photo assignment

The most recent assignment for my Digital Images class was Dynamic Range, which I guess I would define as multiple exposures within one image. Or being able to show the detail that's in the shadows and in the highlights, without having any parts of the image too overexposed or too underexposed. I did an assignment similar to this in my high school photography class, and I was excited to try it again!

 

We took a class field trip to the Quincy Mine, so that's where all of these pictures were taken. For the assignment we were supposed to use one RAW image; overexpose a copy, underexpose a copy, and then combine the two in Photoshop. For some of these, I used more than two exposures, but here's an overexposed, an underexposed, and a final image for each so you get the idea!





This train one ended up being my second favorite, and I almost turned it in, but didn't. And then in class I learned that my instructor despises this train because he can never get a decent picture of it, which made me wish I had submitted this. Because I think this shot is pretty decent and I just love to prove people wrong :)


This is the one that I ended up turning in. It's the same scene as one of the previous pictures, but I had to go back and redo it, just to make sure I got a good picture. Because once I thought about it, I knew I would kick myself if the first one didn't turn out and I hadn't tried again. And as usual, I'm glad I did!


And just like our previous field trips, I was the last to leave. But that's ok. Because you can never spend too much time doing what you love.


-sara

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Comments: 2
  • #1

    Larissa (Wednesday, 22 October 2014 10:02)

    Okay, so I am in. love. with. these. pictures.
    Do you do this in photoshop, or is there a way I can try this in lightroom? or do you not use lightroom?

  • #2

    Sara (Wednesday, 22 October 2014 11:39)

    Thanks Larissa! I did these using Photoshop Elements, but I do have Lightroom. However, I'm new to it and I don't use it very often, so I'm not sure if there's a good way to do this with it or not.